FAQ

About Hemp

What is Hemp?
Are Hemp Products legal in Canada?
What’s the Difference between hemp and marijuana?
Can you get high from eating hemp products?
Will I fail a urine drug test because I eat Ruth’s Hemp Foods?
What are the Benefits of Eating Hemp Products?
Where does Ruth’s Hemp Foods get its hemp from?
Do hemp oil and flax oil provide the same benefits?
About EFAs

Why do we need Essential Fatty Acids?
Why do we need Omega 3?
Why do we need Omega 6?
Where can I get more information on Fats, Oils and EFA’s?
What are fatty acids?
About Ruth’s Hemp Foods

Do you use certified organic hemp?
Are Ruth’s Hemp Foods GMO free?
Which of your products are gluten-free?
Which of your products are Kosher?
Which of your products contain dairy products, or are processed in a facility that handles dairy?
Which of your products contain nuts, or are processed in a facility that uses nuts?
Is it safe to use your hemp products while pregnant (or nursing)?
Is Ruth’s Certified Organic Hemp Oil cold pressed?
Are Ruth’s salad dressings vinegar-free?
How is your SoftHemp processed, and in particular, how do you remove the shell in your SoftHemp?
How should I store Ruth’s SoftHemp?
At which temperature are your protein powders processed? Also what process do you use and are the enzymes still intact in the finished product?
How should I store Ruth’s Hemp Protein powders?
What is the percentage of ingredients in Ruth’s Hemp Protein Powders?
Can you tell me a little more in general about Ruth’s Hemp Protein Powders?
Could there be any flax residue in your 100% hemp protein powder?
For Ruth’s Hemp Protein powders, what is the recommended daily serving?
How many scoops are in a serving of Ruth’s Hemp Protein powders?
Can you suggest some ways to use Ruth’s Protein Powders?
What’s maca? Where can I find out more about it?
What’s the difference between ground flax and sprouted flax?
Where can I buy Ruth’s Hemp Foods?
I am a retailer. How can I buy Ruth’s Hemp Foods?
What is Hemp?

The Latin name for hemp is cannabis sativa. It grows in moderate climates. Both the fibre and the seed have been used by people around the world for thousands of years, as it is very easily grown, and has many benefits.

There are about 500 different varieties of cannabis sativa, and they can roughly be divided into 3 categories:

useful for fibre
useful for oil
useful for medicine and/or recreation (also known as marijuana)
Different parts of the plant are used depending on what you want to do with it. If you are growing a fibre variety, you will use the stalk. It has thousands of used from car parts (in the form of non-wovens or compressed into polymers) to wedding dresses (in the form of a hemp-silk blend). If you are growing a food and/or oil variety, you will use the seed. If you are growing a drug variety, you will use the bud and perhaps the leaves.

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Are Hemp Products legal in Canada?

Yes. In April, 1998, Health Canada amended the Controlled Drugs and Subtances Act by adding regulations to make it legal to grow hemp in Canada. In order to grow hemp, you must obtain a licence from Health Canada. Information on the Hemp Regulations is found on Health Canada’s web site at http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/therapeut/drhtmeng/hemp.html.

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What’s the Difference between hemp and marijuana?

Many people confuse hemp with marijuana, but hemp is not psychoactive. The psychoactive element of marijuana, THC, exists in hemp, but in amounts so small as to be insignificant. Whereas beer contains about 10 times the alcohol of de-alcoholized beer, marijuana contains about 60 times more THC than hemp.

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Can you get high from eating hemp products?

Not a chance. In compliance with government regulation, our hemp is tested in the field, and our hemp seed, oil, hempnut and hempmeal are tested before being added to our products. We are required to have less than 10 ppm THC (the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana) in our hemp products, but in actual fact, NO THC can be detected in our products.

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Will I fail a urine drug test because I eat Ruth’s Hemp Foods?

If the only THC in your diet comes from Ruth’s Hemp Foods, then you have nothing to fear from a urine test. Ruth’s Hemp Foods are a signatory to TestPledge. TestPledge has determined through science-based studies the level THC in hemp that would trigger a positive urine test. TestPledge signatories agree to keeping the THC in their products below those levels, to guarantee that a positive urine test will not be triggered through the use of their products. For more information, please see www.testpledge.org.

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What are the Benefits of Eating Hemp Products?

The inside of the hemp seed, also known as the hempnut, is rich in both protein and oil. And the oil is one of the richest sources of essential fatty acids (EFAs). You may choose to eat the entire seed, or only the hempnut, or to press the oil out of the seed and use the oil and the meal (the rest) separately.

Hemp is a great source of protein. It has almost as much protein as whole (or fermented) soybeans. That means more than virtually any other protein source, including fish, beef, eggs, chicken or tofu.

Protein consists of amino acids. Of the 20, eight are considered essential, that is, your body cannot make them itself, but MUST get them from food. And although hemp doesn’t have quite as much protein as whole soy, the percentage of Essential Amino Acids, is higher in hemp than soy. Go for quality – not quantity! As well, hemp is not genetically modified, unlike most soy.

Most Hemp oil is equally remarkable. Most hemp oil contains about 56% Omega 6 or Linoleic Acid (LA), 20% Omega 3 or Alpha Linolenic Acid (ALA): almost a 3:1 ratio of Omega 6:3. As well, hemp oil contains about 3% gamma linolenic acid (GLA), a rare fatty acid found primarily in evening primrose and borage.

Ruth’s Certified Organic Hemp Oil contains a 2:1 ratio of Omega 6:3, i.e., less Omega 6, more Omega 3 (as well as the GLA). This is wonderful, considering that North American diets have an overabundance of Omega 6, but need more Omega 3. Hemp oil is the only food oil that contains Omega 6, 3 and GLA.

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Where does Ruth’s Hemp Foods get its hemp from?

Our sister company, R&D Hemp Inc., contracts directly with family farms on the Canadian prairie. We take pride in knowing everything about our hemp, from the ground up.

R&D Hemp contracts exclusively for Certified Organic hemp seed.

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Do hemp oil and flax oil provide the same benefits?

No. While they both contain both Omega 6 and Omega 3, they do so in inverse proportions. In other words, the Omega 6:Omega 3 ratio in hemp is roughly 3:1, while in flax its 1:3. In addition, flax contains no GLA.

Additionally, the non-oil part of the hemp seed is very rich in protein, while the non-oil portion of the flax seed is rich in lignans, a valuable cancer-fighting nutrient.

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Why do we need Essential Fatty Acids?

Essential Fatty Acids ensure healthy and fluid cell membranes. A fluid cell membrane is critical for the effective exchange of nutrients, oxygen and waste products. EFAs are also necessary for maintaining the water barrier of our skin. A vast body of literature exists on the benefits of EFAs to our health.

“EFAs are involved with producing life energy in our body from food substances and moving that energy throughout our systems. They govern growth , vitality and mental state. They hook up oxygen, electron transport, and energy in the process of oxidation.”

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Why do we need Omega 3?

The health effects of the Omega 3 family of fatty acids (primarily alpha-linolenic, EPA and DHA) have been studied extensively, and are perhaps best described by the symptoms of Omega 3 deficiency. These include dry and/or scaly skin, weak immune system, poor motor co-ordination, high blood pressure and low metabolic rate.

Common foods do not contain much (if any) Omega 3. In recent years, health conscious people have started taking flax and fish oils for this important EFA. However, too much of a good thing is bad and that holds true for this as well.

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Why do we need Omega 6?

The Omega 6 family of polyunsaturates comprises several different fatty acids, which we can get on their own from food sources, or which our bodies can metabolize from Omega 6. The only one that cannot be metabolized is Linoleic acid (LA).

Some of the Omega 6 fatty acids (notably linoleic and gamma-linolenic) have been the source of many studies. They have been used to treat and prevent many disease states such as eczema, rheumatoid arthritis, hypertension, circulatory problems, and PMS.

Like any other substance, an overabundance of Omega 6 can also be harmful, and many of the diseases we see in North America today come from the overload of Omega 6 in our diet, as it is found in many common foods.

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Where can I get more information on Fats, Oils and EFA’s?

There are many books on the market to choose from, many of which have different slants. I recommend “Fats that Heal, Fats that Kill”, by Udo Erasmus. It conveys an enormous amount of information in understandable form.

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What are fatty acids?

A fatty acid is a molecule consisting of a chain of carbon atoms with an organic acid group at one end.

The number of carbon atoms can vary from 4 to 24, and each is surrounded by hydrogen atoms. Each carbon atom is normally joined to the next one by two electrons, in what is known as a single bond. If the carbon atoms are all linked by single bonds, the fatty acid is known as “saturated”. Saturated fatty acids are very stable, meaning their structure is difficult to disrupt through light, heat or oxygen, so manufacturers like to use them for food because of their long shelf lives. But depending on their length, saturated fatty acids may not be easily digestible, and can lead to poor health.

Sometimes one of the hydrogen atoms is replaced by another bond, so that now, some carbon atoms is joined by a double bond. Fatty acids containing double bonds are known as “unsaturated”. If more than one double bond exists in a fatty acid molecule, it is known as “poly-unsaturated”. These polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are often referred to as “good fats”, because these double bonds contain some unique, health-giving properties. However, they are quite delicate and can be easily destroyed by light, heat and oxygen.

The naming system for fatty acids reflect all of these things: the number of carbon atoms in the chain, the number of double bonds it contains, and the position of the first one. Hence, 18:3n-6 means that a fatty acid contains 18 carbon atoms, with 3 double-bonds, with the first one after the 6th carbon atom.

Although plants, animals and humans can metabolize specific PUFAs from saturated fatty acids, there are two very important PUFAs that humans must get from plants. These are Linoleic Acid (18:2n-6) LA (part of the Omega 6 family of fatty acids) and Alpha-Linolenic Acid (18:3n-6) ALA (part of the Omega 3 family). Because these two fatty acids are indispensable to our health, and we cannot make them ourselves, they are known as Essential Fatty Acids, or EFAs.

Enzymes within our bodies lengthen the EFAs to insert more double bonds and create new, more highly unsaturated fatty acids. These attract oxygen and help transform light into electrical energy and then to nerve impulses.

This latter group of fatty acids includes gamma-linolenic acid or GLA, which our body derives from Linoleic Acid and from a very few plant sources. The body of literature on GLA is already significant: we know that GLA helps in cases of rheumatoid arthritis, skin disorders, hypertension, diabetes and cancer. The enzyme necessary to make GLA from Omega 6 is absent in about 30% of the population, therefore GLA supplementation is necessary. The most common sources of GLA in food are Evening Primrose oil and Borage oil.

Stearidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are fatty acids that we obtain from a few nutrient sources and which our bodies can metabolize from Alpha-linolenic Acid. Health professionals recognize the necessity of these fatty acids for lowering the risk of heart disease and anti-thrombotic properties.

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Do you use certified organic hemp?

Yes. With only one exception, the hemp in our products is certified organic. We would love it if our whole line were certified organic, but our main goal is to introduce hemp food into peoples’ diets at reasonable prices. When that can be done with certified organic ingredients, we will certainly do so!

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Are Ruth’s Hemp Foods GMO free?

We strongly believe in GMO-free foods. We are very careful in product development to screen for ingredients from non-GMO crops. The Canadian Council of Grocery distributors has banned foods from the major supermarkets that are labelled GMO-free. Although our products are ALWAYS GMO-free, we have been forced to remove notice of this from the labels in order to gain distribution through major supermarkets. Please be assured that we do not use ingredients from genetically modified crops in any of our foods.

Please tell your local supermarket that you want the right to choose GMO-free foods and you want to see it on the labels. Because the supermarkets won’t tell you the GMO status of your food, Greenpeace has published a booklet showing many food products (including ours) and their GMO status. You can browse or order this booklet from http://www.greenpeace.ca/shoppersguide For more information on the fight to label genetically engineered foods, please visit http://www.thecampaign.org.

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Which of your products are gluten-free?

Most of Ruth’s products are gluten-free. They are available in Canada and the US, and can be purchased from retailers or ordered online.

Here’s a list of all of Ruth’s products which are Gluten-Free:

Honey Mustard Salad Dressing
Omega Burgers (all flavours)
Protein Powders (all flavours)
Hemp Oil
SoftHemp (shelled hemp seed)
Chips (all flavours) (currently not on the market, but re-appearing soon)
Bars:
Hemp & Trail
Tropical Flax
Very Berry Flax
CranNut Flax
Ginger Almond Maca
Chocolate Ginger Maca
Lemon Hazelnut Maca
The bars not listed here (a few of our hemp bars) do contain oats. As mentioned, people generally regard oats as containing gluten, but in fact they do not, other than through cross-contamination. We have had our oats tested, and they are gluten-free, so technically, all bars are gluten-free, but most celiacs would shy away from them.
We do not run on a dedicated gluten-free line, however we follow good manufacturing practices to ensure cross-contamination will not occur, and have had no problems to date.

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Which of your products are Kosher?

All of our products are Kosher except our Balsamic Hemp salad dressing.

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Which of your products contain dairy products, or are processed in a facility that handles dairy?

None of our products contain dairy, but in our Omega burgers and salad dressings are made in facilities that occasionally handle dairy. Good manufacturing practices are used to avoid any potential contamination of non-dairy products.

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Which of your products contain nuts, or are processed in a facility that uses nuts?

Bars: contain nuts and are processed in a facility that uses nuts.

Protein powders, oil, SoftHempTM: do not contain nuts and are processed in a facility that never uses nuts.

Salad Dressings: do not contain nuts but are processed in a facility that uses nut oils.

Omega Burgers: do not contain nuts but are processed in a facility that uses nuts.

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Is it safe to use your hemp products while pregnant (or nursing)?

We feel that all of our foods are safe during pregnancy (and while nursing). On the other hand, to our knowledge, there has not been a study of hemp and pregnancy, just many healthy pregnancies. However, whereas we feel there is no problem, only good health to be had, we do not dispense medical advice. If in doubt, please consult your doctor.

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Is Ruth’s Certified Organic Hemp Oil cold pressed?

Yes, at very low temperatures. It is topped off with nitrogen (an inert gas) to prevent exposure to oxygen (as oxygen leads to rancidity). Please refrigerate after opening.

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Are Ruth’s salad dressings vinegar-free?

Our two salad dressings, Balsamic Hemp, and Hemp & Honey Mustard, are not vinegar-free dressings. Balsamic Hemp uses balsamic vinegar, and Hemp & Honey Mustard uses apple cider vinegar. In addition, the Hemp & Honey Mustard is gluten-free.

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How is your SoftHemp processed, and in particular, how do you remove the shell in your SoftHemp?

The shell (hull) of the seed is removed through a process where the shelled seeds fall into a spinner and are cracked against the sides, and then air separates the seeds from the hull (because the hull is heavier, so air blows over and separates them).

There is no high heat involved in processing our products.

Our SoftHemp is available in:

a single serve 2oz snack pack (56g) – there are 12 per case;
an 8oz refill (227g) – there are 6 per case; and,
(in case you’re interested) a 5lb bulk pail..
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How should I store Ruth’s SoftHemp?

We package our SoftHemp under nitrogen (no oxygen in the container), so our SoftHemp has a shelf life of a minimum of twelve months, and refrigeration is not necessary (but refrigeration doesn’t hurt, especially in very hot weather).

In the case of the bulk 5lb pail, it may be best to keep it in a basement or other cooler place and just fill a smaller container for everyday use on your kitchen counter.

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At which temperature are your protein powders processed? Also what process do you use and are the enzymes still intact in the finished product?

Our protein powders are processed at ambient temperature (20C – 68F), and during the milling process the powder may heat up to 35C (95F) due to friction.

Although we have not tested for enzymes in the hemp protein, to our knowledge, they are not destroyed at this heat level, and we do know that active enzymes exist in our protein powders that contain sprouted flax.

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How should I store Ruth’s Hemp Protein powders?

Our powders should be stored out of direct heat. Ambient (regular room) temperatures are fine, and the fridge won’t hurt it. (Personally I use the same one, and keep mine in the kitchen cupboard or in a corner of the kitchen counter – it’s great!)

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What is the percentage of ingredients in Ruth’s Hemp Protein Powders?

Ruth’s Certified Organic Hemp Protein powder contains: 100% certified organic Hemp.

Ruth’s Certified Organic Hemp Protein powder with Sprouted Flax contains: 67% certified organic Hemp and 33% certified organic Sprouted Flax.

Ruth’s Certified Organic Hemp Protein powder with Sprouted Flax and Maca contains: 50% certified organic Hemp, 33% certified organic Sprouted Flax, & 17% raw, certified organic Maca.

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Can you tell me a little more in general about Ruth’s Hemp Protein Powders?

They’re certified organic, contain all essential amino acids, and all essential fatty acids. Our two blends that contain Sprouted Flax are also bio-activated through active enzymes due to sprouting.

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Could there be any flax residue in your 100% hemp protein powder?

There a potential for flax residues to be present in the 100% hemp protein powder is extremely low, as they share only a filling machine, which is cleaned between uses. The hemp protein itself is made on a different machine than the flax.

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For Ruth’s Hemp Protein powders, what is the recommended daily serving?

The suggested intake of our powders are: for the 100% hemp protein, you can have as much as you’d like a day; for the maca or sprouted flax, the suggested maximum is 1 – 2 servings per day (depending whether it’s about 1 to 2 scoops per serving).

The suggested intake of maca is 5,000 mg per day, which is found in 2 scoops of our Hemp Protein powder with Sprouted Flax and Mac so, for example, our Customer Service rep, Alison, reports that for herself personally, she reduces her intake to 1 scoop per day if she’s also having one of our maca bars in the same day (as our maca bars contain 2,000 mg of maca each).

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How many scoops are in a serving of Ruth’s Hemp Protein powders?

The nutritional info on our powder labels & website is for a serving of 30g, which is actually 2 heaping scoops (or 2 Tbsp), (this may appear incorrectly due to a printing error which will be corrected at the next re-printing). From the feedback we have received, it does seem a lot of people follow the instructions, use only one scoop and are achieving great results. You may want to experiment, and see what works best for you.

Our Customer Service rep, Alison, has recently started on our Hemp Flax & Maca powder, and reports that she has discovered that she personally likes to have 1 scoop, twice per day. “It’s been great!”

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Can you suggest some ways to use Ruth’s Protein Powders?

Mix it up… here’s Ruth’s favourite smoothie (in case you may not have already seen this recipe on our website) – she makes it in a Vitamix, so she uses the whole fruit, not juice – she says it’s a great start to her day, and keeps her going until early afternoon!:

1 lemon (peeled)
1/2 banana
1/4 cup frozen mixed berries
1″ fresh ginger (peeled)
1 – 2 scoops Hemp Protein (Ruth actually uses the Hemp-Flax-Maca)
1 cup of water, or to desired thickness.
1 – 2 ice cubes
Shake it up… 1 – 2 scoops in a wide-mouthed shaker cup with a lid, with 125 – 250 ml (4 to 8 oz) of your favourite ready-made store-bought juice blend, smoothie, or soy/rice milk.
(Our Customer Service rep, Alison, reports that she always keeps some of her favourite beverages on hand, ready when she is, to shake up once or twice a day with a scoop of Ruth’s Hemp/Flax/Maca powder. “It works great!”)

Stir it up… 1 – 2 scoops with 225ml (8 oz) of yogurt. Tasty!

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What’s maca? Where can I find out more about it?

Maca is a root vegetable from Peru. It is known as the Incan Superfood, because of it’s amazing health-giving qualities. The best people to answer your maca questions are our friends at www.navitasnaturals.com.

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What’s the difference between ground flax and sprouted flax?

The main functional difference is bio-availability. Think about the flax seed – it wants to be disseminated, and one way this happens is through birds. It does not want to be digested, and is difficult to digest in whole or ground form.

However once it is sprouted, the enzymes that create the miracle of life also transform the nutritive value of the flax, to make the nutrients far more bio-available.

The best place to get more information about sprouted flax is www.activatedbotanicals.com

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Where can I buy Ruth’s Hemp Foods?

Our products are available in mainstream distribution in both Canada & the U.S., so you should be able to find Ruth’s Hemp Foods at your favourite local health food retailer – if not, just ask them to have our products ordered in.

The stores usually know which distributors to order them from already – if in doubt, check our website, just click on “Distributors”, and search by state/province. If they do not deal with these distributors (or there is something they’d like that their distributor may not carry), we are also able to ship directly from our warehouse.

For a partial list of retailers in Canada who carry Ruth’s Hemp Foods, please visit our website – just click on “Retailers” and scroll down by province. (Note, not all retailers listed will carry all products, so you may have to shop around a little.) For more retailers in other areas, if in doubt, visit www.yellowpages.ca & search on “health food retailers”.

For the US, we will soon add a store locator to our site. In the meantime, just ask at your favourite store – we are widespread distribution, so any store should be able to get our products.

As an option, you may also shop online at our site! Just click on the section called “Shop Now” (using Visa or Mastercard), as you may have already discovered. Since we do prefer to support our retailers, our online prices are essentially the same as what you would find through your preferred local health food store, once shipping is factored in.

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I am a retailer. How can I buy Ruth’s Hemp Foods?

Our products are available in mainstream distribution in both Canada & the U.S., so you should be able to find Ruth’s Hemp Foods through your favourite local distributor. If not, just ask to have them carry our products. If in doubt of which distributor carries Ruth’s Hemp Foods in your area, check our website – just click on “Distributors”, and search by state/province.

If you do not deal with these distributors (or there is something you would like that the distributor may not carry, such as perhaps Ruth’s Certified Organic Hemp Oil), we are also able to ship directly from our warehouse.

Since we do prefer to support our distributors, our direct wholesale prices are essentially the same as what you would find through your local distributor.

For more information, please contact us: info@RuthsHempFoods.com

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As a reminder, Ruth’s line is always:

GMO-free;
no refined sugar;
no hydrogenated or trans-fats;
no artificial colours, preservatives or fillers;
the fruit in the bars is unsulfured; and,
most of the products are certified organic.
We hope this helps. If you have any questions or comments, please do not hesitate to share them with us – and thank you for your interest in Ruth’s Hemp Foods!